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Web based anxiety treatment for adults who stutter

| 25.11.2014

The Australian Stuttering Research Centre is asking for adults who stammer to try a web-based Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) program on speech-related anxiety.

ASRC website, screenshotThe Australian Stuttering Research Centre (ASRC) at the University of Sydney, Australia, is conducting a research project investigating the effect of a web-based Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) program on speech-related anxiety. Any adult who stutters (age 18 years and over) with functional English skills (reading and writing) is welcome to participate. This research project is being conducted internationally.

If you are interested in participating in the study, you can access the web-based CBT program by emailing the Australian Stuttering Research Centre (asrc@sydney.edu.au) and answering a brief questionnaire about your stuttering and treatment history - your consent to participate in the study will be implied on receipt of this information.

Once you login, you will have access to the web-based CBT program for a 5 month period. The program can be completed at your own pace, and should be accessed on a regular, weekly basis in order to gain the full benefit of the program. The program involves working through a series of graded tasks which have been designed by a psychologist to help reduce speech-related anxiety. Before and immediately after completing the program, you will be asked to complete some online questionnaires which are designed to give us a clearer picture of the experience of anxiety for adults who stutter. These questionnaires may take up to an hour to complete on each of these two occassions.

If you have any questions about this study or if you would like further information, please feel free to contact the Australian Stuttering Research Centre on +61 2 9351 9061 (phone) or asrc@sydney.edu.au (email). The study is being conducted by Professor Mark Onslow, Associate Professor Ross Menzies, Associate Professor Ann Packman, and Dr Sue O'Brian.

Australian Stuttering Research Centre, November 2014